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health coach for Interstital Cystitis

Interstitial cystitis, often called IC for short, is a chronic, painful bladder condition. It is estimated that between 4 and 12 million people may have IC. That figure is more than the number of people with breast cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and autism combined. IC can often be mistaken or misdiagnosed as a reoccurring bladder infection or UTI. In severe flares, IC patients can suffer from debilitating pelvic pain that requires trips to the bathroom as often as every 10 to 15 minutes to provide temporary relief.

While the exact cause of this condition is unknown, some contributing factors may include autoimmune reactions, heredity, bacterial infections such as lyme disease, allergies, and food sensitivities. IC mainly effects women, and can have a huge impact on one's quality of life if not properly controlled. Due to the sometimes painful and debilitating symptoms, the Social Security Administration awards benefits to people who are disabled such that they can't work as a result of interstitial cystitis.

According to Mayo Clinic, the signs and symptoms of IC include: 

  • Pain in your pelvis or between the vagina and anus in women
  • Pain between the scrotum and anus in men (perineum)
  • Chronic pelvic pain
  • A persistent, urgent need to urinate
  • Frequent urination, often of small amounts, throughout the day and night (up to 60 times a day)
  • Pain or discomfort while the bladder fills and relief after urinating.
  • Pain during sexual intercourse.

While there is currently no cure for IC, many people have successfully put the condition into remission through effective diet and lifestyle changes. There are also now many complementary and alternative healthcare options for treating IC. 

Possible dietary triggers:

While symptoms vary from person to person, studies have found that the following are common dietary triggers for those dealing with IC:

  • Foods and beverages containing artificial sweeteners (cranberry juice)
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine (sodas, coffees and teas)
  • Hot peppers and spicy foods
  • Chocolate
  • Tomato products
  • Soy products

These foods and beverages are not necessarily triggers for everyone. Ashley has found a combination of dietary and lifestyle changes that have allowed her to control her IC, and she is happy to spend time going through your individual health history and unique lifestyle factors to help you determine your goals and tips for managing your IC through nutrition and self-care practices. 

find an interstital cystitis health care provider

If you think you have IC or are currently experiencing severe issues with the condition, it is advised to consult with a medical doctor about your condition. The Interstitial Cystitis Association (ICA) Healthcare Provider Registry includes a list of clinicians who have agreed to be a referral source for Interstitial Cystitis patients. The types of healthcare providers on this list include urologists, gynecologists, urogynecologists, primary care practitioners, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and dietitians.

other interstitial Cystitis (IC) Resources

Interstitial Cystitis (Mayo Clinic)-Symptoms and causes of interstitial cystitis. 

IC Network- The IC Network helps the 12 million men and women with interstitial cystitis (IC) and chronic pelvic pain understand the symptoms, causes and treatments.

Interstitial Cystitis Association-The ICA is the only nonprofit charitable organization dedicated solely to improving the quality of lives of people living with interstitial cystitis.

Prelief-A drug-free dietary supplement that neutralizes acid in foods.

Receptra Naturals-Offers premium, whole plant, pure hemp (CBD) extracts for sale in all 50 States.

Disclaimer: Ashley Iovinelli | Wheatgrass Warrior does not engage in the practice of medicine. It is not a medical authority nor does it claim to have medical knowledge. In all cases, Wheatgrass Warrior recommends that you consult your own physician regarding any course of treatment or medication.